Knight Lore

by Paul Morrison


If Ultimate's Jetpac was a brilliant arcade game, then Knight Lore was revolutionary and positively jaw-dropping. You know it was. You can still remember the first time you played it... you'd never seen anything like it. And neither had I.

When you were used to playing side-scrolling or top-down-view games, the sight of Knight Lore's isometric 3D was incredible. You'd never seen a castle look as amazing as it did here, and the extra dimension added so much in terms of what could be done with the game.

To avoid the guard, Sabreman uses the ageless child's trick... if I can't see him, he can't see me.

To avoid the guard, Sabreman uses the ageless child's trick... if I can't see him, he can't see me.

Poor old Sabreman has been stricken by the werewolf (wulf?)'s curse. The only way he can free himself is by travelling to Castle Knight Lore and placing six individual objects into the wizard's cauldron. Nothing else will do... and to make matters worse, he only has 40 days and 40 nights in which to complete his task!

If you've ever played Knight Lore you know that 40 days and 40 nights is no time at all. In one of the more stunning early game moments, Sabreman's transformation happen more frequently than you'd expect... a day in game time does not last very long!

The famous transformation.  It's not quite Rick Baker, but we loved it.

The famous transformation.  It's not quite Rick Baker, but we loved it.

The 3D effect makes everything look so solid, and it feels it too when you mistime a jump and smash right into something you really needed to avoid. It took some getting used to after the 2D planes of traditional platform games. I never completed it, but it was brillliant fun trying, and it set a standard that proved difficult to match, even for Ultimate themselves.