All is not lost... but a lot of it is...

by Paul Morrison


One of the things you might not appreciate about a project like this is the vast amount of research that's needed.  Research comes in many forms... for instance, playing all those lovely old games is research.  But another element of the research process is trying to track people down and finding out what they've been up to and where on the internet they reside (if indeed they do).

There have been many interviews and features and websites over the years with a large number of the people I'm looking for.  But you'll find that a lot of them took place or existed a long time ago, and in the intervening years the servers that they were hosted on have expired or been shut down.

It's hard to stress just how much of a problem this is.  For one thing, it means that we've lost huge amounts of interesting and informative text.  For another, it can mean that the people I'm looking for have, to all intents and purposes, "disappeared".

Sadly, this is an all-too-common sight in the world of retro research...

Sadly, this is an all-too-common sight in the world of retro research...

That's the question you have to ask... how do you go about finding someone that doesn't appear to exist?

The main hope is that someone you talk to knows somebody else and can put you in touch with them.  Occasionally, you may stumble across someone in an unexpected place and can attempt contact like that.  But on other occasions, you can only draw a blank.

I can't deny that this is frustrating, but you can only work with what you've got.  It's almost more irritating that the interviews from the past have vanished forever.  In some cases, they may have been the only documentation we would ever have.

So it goes.  There are a few ways and means, all of which I will exhaust in my quest to make this the best book I possibly can.  For now though, it's back to the writing...